ABBOZZO GALLERY
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KINSMAN ROBINSON GALLERIES
LOCH GALLERY (CALGARY)
LOCH GALLERY (TORONTO)
LOCH GALLERY (WINNIPEG)
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ZWICKER'S GALLERY


The Art Dealers Association of Canada Inc. (ADAC) is a national not-for-profit organization founded in 1966. ADAC is the only National Association of art dealers representing artists throughout Canada. ADAC maintains a high standard of connoisseurship and adherence to ethical practice within the profession. Dealers are selected for their knowledge and scholarship in their respective fields of expertise.

The ADAC mandate includes stimulating the art market in Canada, and encouraging the awareness of the visual arts both nationally and abroad.

















The gallery Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain is proud to present a series a new drawings by Ed Pien whose Ad Infinitum is currently featured in Shine a Light at the National Gallery of Canada. Relinquishing the comforts and habits of the known, his imagery and his processes reveal the risks and rewards of traversing the territory of the unknown. Rather than adopt an illustrative approach, Pien works spontaneously. No preconceived image is held; each line begets the next, necessitating a leap of faith on the part of the artist. The images generated through this organic process capture the immediacy of his linear gestures and the fluidity of his brushwork in a highly expressive visual field. Pien’s imagery conjures a fantastic and disturbing universe. His all-over ink and gouache compositions are brimming with mutant monsters, hybrid creatures and celestial beings — angelic and demonic — summoned from his subconscious. Blue giants, greenhaired witches, menacing night-walkers, shamanistic puppet-players, winged figures with bulging eyeballs, two-headed teddy bears and other similarly tragic Halloween-types inhabit these interior worlds. In each of the artist’s vignettes, an event instigated by one of the antagonists unfolds before the viewer, the activities often carrying on beyond the edges of the paper. Allusions to various forms of social transgression and power imbalances persist, accentuating the vulnerability of the body and the psyche. Playful, provocative, sensual and sinister, Pien’s drawings elicit and mirror the anxieties, fears and desires that issue from the depths of our being.


























With so much talk in Toronto about subways, Stephen Bulger Gallery offers a photographic perspective on the subject.

Through the use of historical and contemporary photographs, we celebrate the ingenuity and culture of subways. Since the late 19th Century, cities have turned to tunnelling to transport their ever growing mass. Efficient, claustrophobic, worn down and constantly updated, for many city dwellers subways are a necessary part of their daily lives. Transporting oneself underground seems both otherworldly and commonplace; it is a place where solitude is often felt strongly.

This exhibition features work by unknown photographers hired to document the building of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. in New York. Their work is surrounded by photographs taken by a number of known photographers. This theme of construction is complimented by Vid Ingelevics’ photograph made in the Toronto Transit Commission’s Museum Station proudly showing its yellow ceramic tiles that are so familiar to Torontonians. These tiles were replaced with a station re-modification that more obviously echoed its proximity to the Royal Ontario Museum.

Adam Magyar’s steely large scale portraits of New York subway cars from his series “Stainless” are represented, and during the exhibition in our cinema space called CAMERA, we will screen one of his “Stainless” video works. These renowned videos use a high-speed quality control camera used in mass production for capturing fast-moving objects and put it into a human context to speak about our urban world and people living in an urban life.

Bruce Davidson’s haunting colour environmental portraits made in 1980 and published as SUBWAY (St. Ann’s Press, 2003), have been released as an edition of Dye Transfer prints. A selection of Davidson’s famed portraits are shown opposite a suite of Michael Wolf’s celebrated portraits of commuters called “Tokyo Compression”, part of his mammoth project called “Life In Cities”.

A set of film stills from The Warriors, directed by Walter Hill and released in 1979 are displayed across the gallery from a salon of vignettes covering more than 100 years of scenes seen underground while riding the subway. This salon wall includes work by unknown photographers, as well as photographs by Dave Heath, André Kertész, William Klein, Luis Mallo, Jamel Shabazz, Kazuo Sumida, Alexey Titarenko and George S. Zimbel.

Image Credit: Fun, Fun, Montreal Metro, 1987 © George S. Zimbel / Courtesy of Stephen Bulger Gallery












Oeno has curated a stunning show of new works on paper by several gallery artists. Often created quickly, they have an immediacy, a sense of intimacy and fluidity that other art forms sometimes cannot convey. Don Maynard is an established Canadian painter and sculptor who has had many exhibitions of his work in public galleries in Canada and the United States. Maynard has recently moved to Prince Edward County and Oeno is pleased to introduce his work. “Blue River” is comprised of over 50 small panels and is one of the highlights of this show. Internationally renowned printmaker Susan Collett has created new works that evoke the dreaminess and iconography of her travels to China. Ben Woolfitt’s new poignant and evocative works combine text, graphite and silver leaf, fragments of poems reflecting powerful emotions. Quebec artists are well represented in this exhibition. It includes rarely seen paper works by the late painter John Fox, small colourful watercolours by Jennifer Hornyak, and black and white works by Zhu Lan. The gallery is also introducing Quebec artist Catherine Farish. Her Notations is a series of small works printed on player piano rolls. One of the earliest works offered for sale in the exhibition is a rare and original illustrated boxed folio of The Journals of Susanna Moodie, arguably Margaret Atwood’s finest work of poetry. In it, she adopts the voice of Susanna Strickland Moodie, an English woman who came to live in the rural area near Peterborough, Charles Pachter illustrated the poems, and in 1980, 120 copies were hand-printed in a boxed edition which is now in public and private collections around the world. Only a very few remain available for purchase. Rounding out the show are works on mylar and paper by Alice Teichert and mixed media paperworks by Otto Rogers from the 1990s. The gallery also has obtained a few copies of the limited edition book on Otto Roger’s work (now out of print), each accompanied by a small original work - a great Christmas gift. And finally, there is a rare spectacular, monumental watercolour by long time Prince Edward County resident Robert Wiens.








Pierre-François Ouellette art contemporain is proud to present new paintings by Kent Monkman. In keeping with earlier works that explore the mythologies of Western culture illuminating truths about European colonization of North America, Monkman casts his alter ego in the roles of four powerful and mythological females: Danae, Leda, Minerva and Helen of Troy. Against the lush backgrounds of romantic landscapes, Monkman employs the allegorical and sensual language of classical painting to condemn the violation of the land and First Peoples of North America. Borrowing ancient parables from Western cultures as lessons against deception and disguise, Monkman’s paintings reference the lies, failed promises and broken treaties perpetrated by the Canadian and US Governments against indigenous people. -- Kent Monkman is a Canadian artist of Cree ancestry who works with a variety of mediums, including painting, film/video, performance, and installation. He has had solo exhibitions at numerous Canadian museums including the Montreal Museum of Fine Art, the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art in Toronto, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, Woodlands Cultural Centre and the Art Gallery of Hamilton. He has participated in various international group exhibitions including: The American West, at Compton Verney, in Warwickshire, England, Remember Humanity at Witte de With, Rotterdam, the 2010 Sydney Biennale, My Winnipeg at Maison Rouge, Paris, and Oh Canada!, MASS MOCA. Monkman has created site specific performances at the McMichael Canadian Art Collection, Denver Art Museum, The Royal Ontario Museum, and at Compton Verney, he has also made Super 8 versions of these performances which he calls “Colonial Art Space Interventions.” His award-winning short film and video works have been screened at various national and international festivals, including the 2007 and 2008 Berlinale, and the 2007 Toronto International Film Festival. His work is represented in numerous public and private collections including the National Gallery of Canada, Musée d'art contemporain de Rochechouart (France), Musée des beaux-art de Montréal, Musée d'art contemporain de Montréal, Art Gallery of Ontario, Museum London, Woodland Cultural Centre, The Glenbow Museum, Indian Art Centre, Robert McLaughlin Gallery, Mackenzie Art Gallery, the Art Bank of the Canada Council, Smithsonian/National Museum of the American Indian, Vancouver Art Gallery, Fondation de la Maison Rouge(Paris), Rideau Hall (Ottawa), The Logan Collection/Denver Art Museum and Hart House/University of Toronto. In January 2015, he will unveil his installation Casualties of Modernity in the BMO Financial Group Project rooom in Toronto