ABBOZZO GALLERY
ART EMPORIUM, THE
ART PLACEMENT
BAU-XI GALLERY (TORONTO)
BAU-XI GALLERY (VANCOUVER)
BAU-XI PHOTO
BECKETT FINE ART LIMITED
CANADA HOUSE GALLERY
CANADIAN ART GALLERY
CHRISTOPHER CUTTS GALLERY
CHRISTOPHER VARLEY, ART DEALER, INC.
CORKIN GALLERY
DARRELL BELL GALLERY
DIAZ CONTEMPORARY
DOUGLAS REYNOLDS GALLERY
DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY (EDMONTON)
DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY (VANCOUVER)
EDWARD DAY GALLERY
ELISSA CRISTALL GALLERY
FEHELEY FINE ARTS
GALERIE D'AVIGNON
GALERIE ELCA LONDON
GALERIE ERIC KLINKHOFF, INC.
GALERIE SAMUEL LALLOUZ
GALERIE SIMON BLAIS
GALERIE ST-LAURENT + HILL
GALERIE TROIS POINTS
GALERIE VALENTIN
GALLERY 78
GALLERY GEVIK
GRANVILLE FINE ART
HARBOUR GALLERY
HERRINGER KISS GALLERY
JENNIFER KOSTUIK GALLERY
JULIE M. GALLERY
KINSMAN ROBINSON GALLERIES
LOCH GALLERY (CALGARY)
LOCH GALLERY (TORONTO)
LOCH GALLERY (WINNIPEG)
LONSDALE GALLERY
MARCIA RAFELMAN FINE ARTS
MASTERS GALLERY LTD.
MAYBERRY FINE ART (TORONTO)
MAYBERRY FINE ART (WINNIPEG)
MICHAEL GIBSON GALLERY
MIRA GODARD GALLERY
MIRIAM SHIELL FINE ART
NEWZONES GALLERY
NICHOLAS METIVIER GALLERY
NIKOLA RUKAJ GALLERY
ODON WAGNER CONTEMPORARY
ODON WAGNER GALLERY
OLGA KORPER GALLERY
PATRICK MIKHAIL GALLERY
PAUL KUHN GALLERY
PETER ROBERTSON GALLERY
PIERRE-FRANÇOIS OUELLETTE ART CONTEMPORAIN
PRIME GALLERY
P|M GALLERY
ROBERTS GALLERY
RUMI GALLERIES
SANDRA AINSLEY GALLERY
SCOTT GALLERY
SHARON LONDON LISS
STEPHEN BULGER GALLERY
STUDIO 21 FINE ART INC.
THIELSEN GALLERY
TRÉPANIERBAER
TRIAS GALLERY
UNO LANGMANN LIMITED FINE ARTS
WADDINGTON GORCE INC.
WALLACE GALLERIES LTD.
WALLACK GALLERIES
WINCHESTER GALLERIES (OAK BAY AVENUE)
WINCHESTER MODERN
WYNICK/TUCK GALLERY
ZWICKER'S GALLERY


The Art Dealers Association of Canada Inc. (ADAC) is a national not-for-profit organization founded in 1966. ADAC is the only National Association of art dealers representing artists throughout Canada. ADAC maintains a high standard of connoisseurship and adherence to ethical practice within the profession. Dealers are selected for their knowledge and scholarship in their respective fields of expertise.

The ADAC mandate includes stimulating the art market in Canada, and encouraging the awareness of the visual arts both nationally and abroad.



It was while observing one of my professors 30 years ago that the idea came to me: instead of trying to figure out what he was trying to say, I started to watch how he said it. Since then, I started to travel through all life's layers of signs and meanings, drawing pleasure from the discovery of the incongruous in the familiar and the similarities between new or unusual contexts. rnrnThis game of tripping between the levels of reality magnified both my love of traveling and the pleasure I took from just standing still before an ordinary and familiar window. Gradually, my perception shifted from the object toward the context, from isolation toward immersion, from the portrait to the landscape, from the framing to the entire horizon beyond. rnrnIn Voyage dans les Alpes, Horace Benedict De Saussure described the importance of wholistic views, as opposed to the excessive details that mask them. Inspired by the vista from the peak of the Buet Glacier, the instructions De Saussure left for the illustrator Théodore Bourrit embodied Saussure's all-encompassing view. Saussure's observations, penned 237 ago, helped clarify the usefulness of this process for me. rnrnToday, this sense of the whole takes shape through a fresh reading of ordinary textures and the spaces that emerge. The true subject of this exhibition is the virtual and conceptual space that envelops the gallery then unfurls through several windows placed within the space. Physical objects are sign posts, clues, keys that unlock this space and lend it coherence. Thus, the artefacts, some 30 years old, provide a measure of the transformations that, over time, forge an artistic process.






















For the month of April in our main gallery we will be showing late monochromatic works by London artist Margot Ariss (1929-2013) and St. Thomas artist Clark McDougall (1921-1980). Though both artists worked in very different mediums (Margot with clay and Clark with paint), they both understood innately the importance of composition, light, shadow and texture. By not using any colour, both artists created an incredible sense of atmosphere, movement and energy in their work. Margot Ariss's sculpted clay panels from the early 1980s combine clay letters with complex molded and shaped forms. The clay is combined with plaster, canvas, cloth, acrylic and cellulose to build up the smooth rolling designs that hint at snow falls, storms and empty landscapes. She appeals to our emotions through the combined use of light, texture and shadow and the poignant clay lettered poems. Using only the colour of the white gesso, and the shadows created from the forms, Ariss relies on the raw materials and sculpted forms to create the atmosphere. Clark McDougall is best known for his "black enamel" style of painting. In the early 1960s, McDougall's style style changed significantly where the outline became very important to the structure and design of the painting. He quickly embraced the quick drying black enamel car paint which distinguished his style from other regional artists. These newly discovered late 1970s black enamel paintings in our exhibition reveal McDougall's incredible mastery of composition and rhythm. McDougall paints the farms and roads that he is familiar with: Charlie Rowe's House, Stevenson's side yard and Kettle Creek Valley, however, this time, he chooses to remove emotive colour and instead paints playful patterns that delight our eye.






















The gallery is pleased to present “China,” our third solo exhibition of work by Canadian photographer Scott Conarroe.

Conarroe (b. Edmonton, AB, 1974) first visited Beijing in the wake of the 2008 Summer Olympics. He returned to China briefly the following year and in 2012 he began photographing that nation against the backdrop of a railway expansion that rivals America's Interstates in both scope and intent. With imagery from this ongoing study, some earlier impressions, and a surprising new strain of street work, “China” describes a vast historical moment shot through with human-scale dramas.

Conarroe has ranged some twenty provinces by rail. He is 6' tall, blue-eyed and in no danger of blending in. Over thousands of shoulder-to-shoulder and knee-to-knee kilometres he has learned to make primitive small talk and to recede from focus. His view is certainly an outsider's, but even the landscapes in this exhibition contain instances of unguardedness; village men idling at billiards, people bent in picturesque labour and someone's small garden arranged around a drip-filled bucket. Closer in, his tableaux of proletariat ennui, a prosperous couple fighting and women laughing like girls read as stills from a well-produced cinematic feature. The West has been exposed to many iterations of China in recent years: grandiose, tragic, inspiring, infuriating, backwards and futuristic. Each reflects degrees of truth and each leaves something to be desired. Conarroe's China considers the casual yenning of people who live between those extremes.

Conarroe has a BFA from the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design and an MFA from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design. He has been an artist-in-residence at Light Work (US), Villa Sträuli (CH), the FLACC (BE) and a Canadian Armed Forces Civilian Artist in the arctic. He has been awarded numerous prizes, including grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, the 2011 Duke and Duchess of York Prize for Photography, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. Conarroe’s work was included in Canada's pavilion at the Shanghai World Expo and in “Landmark: The Fields of Photography” at Somerset House, London. Last year he was featured at the inaugural Reflexiva Muestra Fotografía de Vila-Real and “Scott Conarroe: By Rail” concluded its five year tour at the University of Western Ontario's McIntosh Gallery. Conarroe’s upcoming monograph, By Rail and By Sea, will be published by Black Dog Publishing. He currently teaches at Emily Carr University of Art and Design and he lives between Vancouver and Zurich.

Scott Conarroe is grateful to the Canada Council for the Arts, The Ontario Arts Council, Sony Canada, and TIME for supporting his work in China.